Can I cover or change the surface of stamped entry?

by Jeremy
(Spokane, Washington)

Q. I have a large stamped entryway/front porch that is dangerous and ugly. I love the look when freshly sealed, but it doesn't last long and is very slippery. I have had people add things like gator grip for traction. When resealed it clouds after a month or so.

I have had different area pros take a crack at fixing but nothing seems to work. They have sealed over the top, stripped and sealed and tried different brands of sealer but always get the same result.

The funny thing is I have a newer different colored stamped fire pit/patio in the back that the same thing happens too. So I think I am giving up on it. Is there a way that I can cover with thin flagstone or acid surface or other ideas. Because of the size I don't want to rip it up, just way too costly. Thanks for any help or advice.

A. In my experience, when concrete sealer turns cloudy or white-ish after it's been applied, it's either a moisture problem, the sealer was applied too thick, or it was a cheap sealer.

Good quality concrete sealers when applied at the right time of day and at the correct thickness hardly ever cloud up, fog, or turn milky white.

Moisture trapped under or in the sealer after it has been sprayed or rolled onto the surface of the concrete will turn the sealer white. Sometimes it will go away on its own, it may take days, weeks, or months.

Sometimes you can spray over the sealer with Xylene, back roll it with a roller and this will help get rid of the cloudy look.

The concrete needs to be very dry when it is sealed, 48 or 72 hours dry after it was washed or if it rained.

You can coat over the stamped concrete, the sealer will have to be removed either by stripping it or grinding it off.

You could do a thin concrete overlay and color & stamp a different pattern. You could spray texture a finish over the entire area. You could resurface and acid stain the patio. There are a number of things you could do, you just need to find the right contractor.

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